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Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis

Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis

About Artist

Basic Information

  • Gender

    Female
  • Artist Statement

    I have always been drawn to the dark and macabre. I have been in a daily battle with depression and anxiety for longer than I can remember. Often, I find myself struggling to determine what is real, questioning how to determine what is real.

    Something happens when I paint, I feel a sense of peace come over me as the images come forth from my soul and take shape on the canvas. Each painting becomes a piece of me.

    Sometimes I just paint something pretty that strikes my fancy, but most of the time I find myself painting a story. Sometimes even I do not know the whole story. The brush does the talking as it spreads color across the canvas.

    Through painting I can feel grounded. In a way, I manage to hold onto this reality by expressing my own version of reality in my artwork.


    ARTIST BIO:
    Maggie Mae Molisee climbed from the primordial ooze in 1969, where she entered this plane of existence in a place known as Vineland, NJ. From there she experienced the transcendent media known as fine art. Inspired by her eccentrically imaginative life-bearers and two creative instructors in particular, she absorbed and developed the use of acrylics, pencils, mixed media and other various artistic mediums. Due to the eclectic nature of both her subject matter and style, which range from still life to still death and from abstract to chaotic realism, her pieces have been described as dark, macabre, surreal, beautiful and inspirational. Maggie now labors and dwells in Shreveport, LA.
  • Resume

    I have painted and worked in other various mediums my whole life. I have only recently gone public with my art - participating in venues such as the Texas Avenue Makers Fair, the Zombie Walk, the Downtown Artwalk and others. I recently submitted a piece to the InGraved exhibit at Art Space making it my first publicly exhibited piece since high school.

Contact Information

Member since
Monday, 10 April 2017 03:37
Last online
4 days ago
  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 8 photos in the Pencil Sketches album
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 6 photos in the Pencil Sketches album
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 2 photos in the Pencil Sketches album
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis commented on this photo

    2 months ago

    The 10 Year Panther got it's name, because it took me 10 years to finish it. I started it in 1989. The canvas had come home from an art class in...

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 12 photos in the Magotpie - Acrylic Paintings album
    2 months ago

    Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis The 10 Year Panther got it's name, because it took me 10 years to finish it. I started it in 1989. The canvas had come home from an art class in 1987. The assignment, to stretch our own canvas, any size we liked. I, of course, had to make it as large as I could with the materials we had on hand. I remember bringing it home at the end of the year. It was a windy day and the wind caught that canvas like a sail and drug me along with it. I started by sketching the face of the panther on the canvas in 1989. Next, for some reason, I painted the eye. I was delighted with the transparency of the eye and attempted to paint around it. Originally, it was meant to be a mountain lion. I just could not mix the colors to my personal satisfaction. The majority of the 10 years it took me to complete this painting, it sat in storage. I would take it out and try to get the hair the "right" color, then, frustrated, put it away again. Finally, one day I decided to paint it black (it would probably be more accurate to have called it 10 Year Leopard, but I named it "10 Year Panther" since that is what it was supposed to have been ). I hate to admit that this painting is the result of me giving up on my original idea, but I have come to realize that sometimes the artist just needs to let the canvas free the art that is locked inside.

    ~2008
    2 months ago
  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 11 photos in the Magotpie - Acrylic Paintings album
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis commented on this photo

    2 months ago

    Found in a long forgotten ossuary, the bones of the mother and her child cling to each other in death as the ties that bind refuse to be broken even...

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 10 photos in the Magotpie - Acrylic Paintings album
    2 months ago

    Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis Found in a long forgotten ossuary, the bones of the mother and her child cling to each other in death as the ties that bind refuse to be broken even in the ever after.
    2 months ago 1
  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis commented on this photo

    2 months ago

    Sometimes our inner beauty gets clouded by external pressures and it’s not always easy to let our true selves shine through.

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 10 photos in the Magotpie - Acrylic Paintings album
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis commented on this photo

    2 months ago

    He said, "Wait for me, my love."
    So, she did. She waited by that tree
    For so long that the tree was force
    To grow up around her.

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 2 photos in the Magotpie - Acrylic Paintings album
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared a photo.
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared a photo.
    2 months ago

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared 6 photos in the Multi-Media album
    2 months ago

    These are multi-media pieces that I make because I love the texture and the effect of making something that is 3D. I use tissue paper, sand,...
  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis commented on this photo

    2 months ago

    The Same End by Maggie Molisee - Vedis

    I participated in the Plein Aire Inspiration Day tour of Forest Park Cemetery on August 13th. At the...

  • Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis shared a photo.
    2 months ago

    Maggie Mae Molisee-Vedis The Same End by Maggie Molisee - Vedis

    I participated in the Plein Aire Inspiration Day tour of Forest Park Cemetery on August 13th. At the beginning of the tour, John Prime said, “Welcome home. We all end up here,” or something similar; I was never very good at remembering quotes. I found myself wandering off frequently from the group as other things caught my attention. I found weird tiny mushrooms that looked like drink umbrellas, a massive deformed tree that looked like a portal to another world, cool crooked headstones covered in vines, even a new grave where the recent rain had shockingly washed away some of the dirt covering the casket making it look like a zombie apocalypse was eminent.

    As I struggled to catch up to the group before becoming hopelessly lost in the vastness of the cemetery, I came across these beautiful old stone pathways. I thought, “Follow your own path, they all end up here.” I knew that this would be my theme. I just didn’t know how I would incorporate this into a painting. I was envisioning some trippy abstract concept. While going through the numerous pictures I took that day, I came across one that I had taken while standing in the middle of the road. Grass was on either side of the road, which split into opposite directions, and in the middle were a group of tombstones with trees flanking either side like a picture frame. The picture itself is not particularly wonderful, but the surreal scene became the focus for my piece. I then incorporated a few of the many interesting details I found in the graveyard that day: stone steps seemingly out of place along the curb, the teddy bear figurines left on a mother’s grave, a wicker cross that laid on an infant’s grave marker, sun faded and weathered silk flowers laying on numerous tombstones, one single rose that had blown away and rested on the ground between the graves, a white teddy bear left beside a stone bench with “Words for Debbie” written on it, left for a daughter who was gone too soon.

    My perspective is that death is always near, yet distant, as I try to follow my own path in life, knowing that it will end in the same place as everyone else’s. One thing that we all have in common is that we will all die eventually. Acknowledging this commonality gives me a greater respect for every living being on the planet, because, truly, we are each living our own lives to the best of our abilities, all of us heading towards the same destination.
    2 months ago